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7 Ways to Make a Shy Cat More Social

 

If you recently adopted a cat that’s extra shy, you might think your need to hurry up and demonstrate how great your house is and how safe she’ll be in it, as well as how much the whole family loves her. But she might take that wrong and get scared instead with all that attention. You shouldn’t hurry up all that attention, however, there’s a few things that can be done to slowly assist that shy kitty into starting to be less scared so she’ll trust you. Here are a few ideas to begin:

 

7. The Correct Environment

You might have a huge, lovely home and wish your brand-new kitty to view all the rooms she will have. However, right now she is probably very overwhelmed. It’s best to give her only a limited area until she gets used to things. Don’t forget that she could also be scared of the sounds and lighting arrangements. So, dim the lights and don’t play any extra loud music or speak loudly around her.

 

6. Offer Places to Hide

Being able to hide is a vital way that cats cope. Don’t see it as something bad that your kitty wishes to hide at times. When she does that, she is evaluating the environment as she calms down. You can encourage her to start to investigate her new territory by giving her places to hide all over the house.  You can do this with boxes, open paper sacks, tunnels, or other simple items she can get into. But don’t ever use plastic bags or a bag with handles as she could get caught and choke.

 

5. Offer Opportunities to Smell Your Scent

For felines, the scent is a vital way to communicate. So help your new kitty learn your unique scent as she stays where she is comfortable. Put a few dirty shirts or some towels you have used around where she likes to hide. These carry your scent for her to smell. So, she can get used to your scent even if she is scared to get right up to you for now.

 

4. Use some tasty treats and food to build trust

When first feeding your new kitty, put her bowl near the place she likes to stay in. Then, you should leave and not stare at her while she eats it. You can eventually watch her from afar, and work your way slowly closer to her as she gets more used to you.  You should schedule her feeding times so she’ll get used to the fact it’s you providing her food.

Also, bring some treats along to bribe her with. Toss a few near her when you walk by and when you come into her area. Some people use the clicker method and click it every time they see the cat do something positive, then give them a treat. Look for how to use the clicker method online. It’s a simple and non-aggressive way to train your cat. Then they learn the things you want them to learn in a gentle method.

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3. Use Play That’s Interactive

Play is very powerful and helps to build trust if you do it right. Get one of those wand like fishing pole toys as this lets you play with the cat, but at a slight distance. She will feel safer and comfier. Don’t rush towards the cat as you play with toys, as that will make her more apprehensive.

In its place, move the toy around along her view and she will get curious about it and hopefully start playing with you. Be sure to be gentle and slow at first.  You don’t want to go crazy at this point. At first, the cat might merely reach out their paw and not go near you at all. It’s a start.

 

2. Use Your Tone Of Voice

Puppies may like voices that are high pitched or excited, but kitties usually don’t appreciate that tone of voice. Alternately, you need to talk with a soft, low, and gentle kind of voice. That helps the kitty get more used to you being there. Cats tend to like soothing, calm sounding voices and hate it when you get all excited and crazy with a squealing voice. If you have kids, you need to explain to them how to be slow, gentle, and speak in a soft voice around their new family member, your kitty.

 

1. Allow the Kitten to Set the Speed

If you truly desire your new cat to be comfy around you, it is vital to let her set the speed of interaction. Let her go to you when she wants and don’t force things. Never pull a cat from a place she’s hiding or try to hurry up the process of gaining her trust. Even when she comes out of her hiding place, never grab her and try to hug her. Cats want to be in control so they are the ones that decide if they want to do something. Then she can be who decides to come to you or not and can leave if she desires. When you allow your kitty to set the speed of interaction, and let her know there’s nothing scary, soon she will believe she’s safe, secure, and in a great forever home for the rest of her life.

 

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